Tanzania’s President John Magufuli dies at 61

Tanzania’s President John Magufuli has died aged 61, the country’s vice-president has announced.

He died on Wednesday from heart complications at a hospital in Dar es Salaam, Samia Suluhu Hassan said in an address on state television.

Mr Magufuli had not been seen in public for more than two weeks, and rumours have been circulating about his health.

Opposition politicians said last week that he had contracted Covid-19, but this has not been confirmed.

“It is with deep regret that I inform you that today… we lost our brave leader, the president of the Republic of Tanzania, John Pombe Magufuli,” Vice-President Hassan said in the announcement.

She said there would be 14 days of national mourning and flags would fly at half mast.

Mr Magufuli was declared president on his 56th birthday in October 2015. He was elected for a second term following a disputed poll last year.

He was one of Africa’s most prominent coronavirus sceptics, and called for prayers and herbal-infused steam therapy to counter the virus.

Tanzania has not published details of its coronavirus cases since May, and the government has refused to purchase vaccines.

Mr Magufuli was last seen in public on 27 February, but Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa insisted last week that the president was “healthy and working hard”.

On Monday, police said they had arrested four people on suspicion of spreading rumours on social media that the president was ill.

Source: BBC

Meet The Youngest Active Female Doctor In South Africa At Age 21 Dr. Thakgalo Thibela:

It is of no doubt that the African continent is on the path of excellence. Millions of young Africans are making a positive change in their various countries. When it comes to technology, science, art, and education – Africans are buzzing it. Over 300 million youth aged 15-24 lived in Africa in 2020 representing nearly 20% of Africa’s population, making up one-fifth of the world’s youth population. If one includes all people aged below 35, this number increases to staggering three-quarters of Africa’s population. This has put Africa at advantage in Youth Development.

In South Africa, A 21-year-old young and brilliant woman named Dr. Thakgalo Thibela has already completed her Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBCh) degree and is currently practicing at the Helen Joseph hospital in Johannesburg. This makes Dr. Thakgalo Thibela the youngest active female doctor in South Africa, according to the spokesperson of The Health Practice Council of South Africa (HPCSA)Priscilla Sekhonyana who confirmed that Thibela was the youngest Active Dr currently on the IN Register.

Achieving such greatness was no walk in the park for Dr. Thibela. She’s had to overcome many challenges and pick herself up to accomplish her dream

Early academic life

Dr. Thibela started primary school at the age of six at Farel Primary School where she was the top student from grade 1 to grade 6. When it was time to go to grade 7, the school made her skip the grade and promoted her straight to high school.

“I was excited and nervous when the school principal announced to me in the presence of my parents that because of my academic excellence, they decided not to waste my time and promote me to high school,” she says.I am enjoying what I am doing at the hospital. I am getting clinical exposure and my theoretical knowledge is also being reinforced.”21-year-old Dr. Thibela

She then went to Lehlasedi High School where she was promoted to grade 10 because of her outstanding academic performance.

“I was the top of the class throughout and as a result, I was promoted to grade 10 within a week after the school principal had realized my potential. In school I was active in extramural activities such as drama, netball, choir, poetry, and debate,” she told News24.

The following year things started to take a different turn for the 21-year-old when she realized that her grade 11 results were not looking good; she knew she had to do something about it. Her teacher also told her that she needed to pull her socks up.

“I attended extra classes, Saturday classes, and studied with friends to improve my marks that were not above average,” said Dr. Thakgalo Thibela.

Luckily for her, all that hard work paid off and in matric, Thibela passed extremely well finishing off her high school career with 7 distinctions at the age of 15.

The journey to becoming a medical doctor

After obtaining seven (7) distinctions in her matric year, Thibela was awarded a bursary from the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), a company that partnered with Lehlasedi High School to sponsor the top learner every year.

She was then admitted to Wits University at the age of 16 enrolling for a six-year degree in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery(MBBCH). She continued to work hard and remain disciplined and her efforts earned her the qualification of her dreams.

Upon admission, the university refused to provide her with accommodation because of her age. Although she was disappointed by that, she was fortunate to get a place to stay not far from the university. She told News24 that she was continually ridiculed by her university peers for not pronouncing certain English words the way that they were pronounced by most, and she was ridiculed for her accent.

“I was deeply demoralised and that affected my self-esteem. That made me scared to express myself in front of my fellow school mates/peers,” she told News24

However, she managed to fight through that and place most of her focus on her school work. Her academic excellence earned her the Golden Key International membership, a recognition for students who are doing well academically and excelling in Universities all over the world

Currently, the young doctor is doing her practical experiential learning at Helen Joseph hospital in Auckland Park – where she started this year.

“I am enjoying what I am doing at the hospital. I am getting clinical exposure and my theoretical knowledge is also being reinforced. What I like about my job is that even though I may look young, patients never refuse to be examined. Instead, they are pleasantly surprised and ask me how old I am and end complimenting me for being a doctor at an early age.”Dr Thakgalo Thibela