A Ghanaian Student in Brazil Drowns And Dies In Waterfalls


Report from Gam Radio Africa Brazil indicates that a Ghanaian student, Kofi Akowuah Junior popularly called Junior or Fii among friends, studying in one of the universities in brazil has been reported dead on Saturday afternoon 31/012021. According to @itatiaiaoficial , despite attempts to revive him after he had drowned, Junior was pronounced dead by a local doctor on their way to the hospital in Minas Gerais a city in Brazil.

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Meek Mill May Visit Ghana in January

American rapper Meek Mill could be planning a trip to Ghana next year.
The Dream Chasers Record boss hinted on visiting the ‘motherland’ in January after sharing a video of some Ghanaian bikers stunting on the streets of Accra on his Instagram account.

‘Ghana in January’  he captioned the post.

Atwea Prayer Mountain to be developed into tourist centre

The Methodist Church is working in close partnership with the Sekyere Central District Assembly to develop the Atwea Prayer mountain into a monumental sacred religious tourist centre.

Right Reverend Robert Osborn Eshun, Bishop of the Effiduase Diocese of the Methodist church, who made this known said the mountain was now one of the most attracted areas for spiritual renewal and it was important to provide facilities to help visitors.

He was speaking at a public lecture to commemorate the relevance of the discovery and existence of the renowned prayer mountain.

It is located at Abasua in the Sekyere Central district and is considered as one of the most sacred religious and spiritual renewal sites, which attracts more than 40,000 pilgrims for spiritual cleansing and prayers every year.

It was discovered by one Reverend Osei Asibey, an evangelist of the Methodist Church in 1965, while he was travelling from Asante Mampong to Effiduase to preach the gospel of Christ to the people in the area.

The mountain, which was known as “Krobo Buo” by the local people, was believed to be the home of a powerful deity who was worshiped and served by a traditional priest for the people of the Abasua community.

After the death of the traditional priest, the deity was deserted and Rev. Asibey, passing through the area to Effiduase was said to have been led to the mountains by Angels of God, who charged him to develop the place into a restive centre for people to pray to seek the face of God to solve their spiritual and physical problems

It had since become the most preferred prayer centre for worshippers and believers from Ghana as well as other countries who visit, for a closer fellowship with God.

Rt. Rev. Eshun said the public lecture was to create awareness for the people to know and understand the historical, spiritual and economic contributions of the prayer mountain to the nation and the world at large.

He acknowledged and commended the immense contribution of Evangelist Richard Kwasi Afriyie, Manager of the Centre, for the remarkable infrastructural development in the centre under his stewardship.

Rt. Rev. Eshun said a strategic partnership for investment with the district assembly would not only help to improve the spiritual renewal, but the socio-economic development of the people in the area and called on the people of the Abasua community to keep their environment clean to make the place attractive to the people.

GHANA’S AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES ATTENDS FUNERAL OF BARBARA TOMMEY

On Friday, September 25, 2020, Ghana’s Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency Dr. Barfuor Adje-Barwuah, paid a private visit to the parents and family of Babara Tommey, the young Ghanaian woman who was gunned down by her husband on September 8, 2020, in Orlando, Florida. During the visit, the Ambassador expressed his deepest sympathies to the family on behalf of President Nana Akufo-Addo and the entire nation.The following day, the Ambassador attended both the memorial and burial services of Barbara Tommey. Speaking at the memorial service, the Ambassador said that although it was unusual for the country and the President to be represented at every citizen’s funeral, it was the gruesome and tragic nature of Barbara’s death that pressed heavily on the country to show up and support the Tommey family. “Even with the brightness of the day, I feel rather cornered that in this room, I can only wish you a very cold morning because of what we are here for. Coming here is a little abnormal because it is not usual for the country and the president to be represented at every citizen’s funeral. However, it is the demonstrably un-Ghanaian way of Barbara’s exit that has made it necessary for me to be here today to register the condolences of the President and the 30 million citizens of Ghana,” the Ambassador sadly expressed. The Ambassador encouraged friends, family and sympathizers present at the funeral to support the family as the days ahead would be extremely difficult, and also pledged his support to the family. “I appeal to all present here today to lend your support to the family in these difficult times so they don’t fall apart. And on my part as the nation’s representative, should it become necessary for any kind of support, I am only a phone call away,” he said.Later in the day, the Ambassador also met with the Ghanaian Association of Orlando, Florida and charged them to build a resilient and resourceful community that is economically viable, socially cohesive and politically relevant.The Ambassador was accompanied by Mr. Kofi Tonto, Head of Information and Public Affairs at the Embassy.

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COVID-19 lockdown: If you need food call these numbers announced by government

As part of measures to ensure that members of the public within the restriction of movement areas – Accra, Kumasi, Tema and Kasoa – live comfortably, the government has announced hotlines for needy communities and households to reach them for food items.

They are 0800800800 and 0800900900.

The distribution of food followed the restriction of movement within some areas and the suspension of social gatherings, which had made it impossible for some people to continue to earn a living through their petty businesses and trading activities.

Mrs Cynthia Mamle Morrison, the Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection who announced the hotlines while the Sector and the Ministry of Finance were offloading food items to faith-based organisations to share to needy individuals and communities in the affected areas.

Government, she said, since the restriction of movement has distributed between 400,000 and 450,000 packs of food every day to needy people including persons with disability in affected areas.

Government also secured a 500 seater-capacity hostel for kayaye, she said, and gave assurance that they would be transported into the facility on Monday April 6, 2020 to ensure they lived comfortably without fear.

Mrs Morrison explained that government collaborated with faith-based organisations through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding, as they had demonstrated a commitment towards promoting the wellbeing of vulnerable people, to enable them to ensure that they lived fulfilled lives.

She advised the public to observe the COVID-19 preventive measures, drink more water with lime, and build their immune systems with healthy diets to resist the virus infection.

He appealed to individuals who benefit from move, to discipline themselves not to strive to take another one which could have been given to another person in dire need.

Mr Ken Ofori-Atta, the Minister of Finance, said if government prolongs the restriction of movement and suspension of social gathering, government would be left with no option than to continue to support the needy and vulnerable with basic necessities.

He believed this pandemic period, called for sacrifice from all bodies including the government to ensure that there was availability of social justice and fairness for everyone.

“Government recognises the economic impact that this partial lockdown has had on families in low income communities who are mostly dependent on their daily income for sustenance; and this is well described by the Akan expression ‘Ankor a, endidi’.

“Fortunately, the Ghana Buffer Stock Company has a significant amount of food stock that can alleviate some of the difficulties within our low-income communities in Accra and Kumasi,” the Minister said.

Most Reverend Dr Paul Kwabena Boafo, the Presiding Bishop of the Methodist and Chairman of the Christian Council of Ghana, expressed gratitude to government and religious bodies for the support rendered to control the effects of the pandemic in the country.

What the nation was facing with the world, he said, was an opportunity to deepen the relationship that existed between faith based organisations and governments to address the challenges of people from the grassroots.

He gave an assurance that the church would identify the most needy households and individuals and distribute the food items to them.

He also said leadership of the churches in the country would continue to pray for leaders of the nation, front liners, borders and entire nation to ensure that the nation emerged victorious in the fight against the pandemic.



Source: GNA

TODAY IN HISTORY: ON MARCH 23, 1998, THE PRESIDENT OF U.S.A, BILL CLINTON ARRIVED IN GHANA.

On March 23, 1998, U.S. Pres. Bill Clinton arrived in Accra, Ghana, to begin a six-country, 12-day visit to Africa, the most extensive journey to that continent ever undertaken by a U.S. leader. He went with high hopes, hailing “the beginning of a new African renaissance.” In retrospect, however, it seemed that the visit might instead have provided grounds for scrutinizing more carefully the premises upon which U.S. policy toward Africa was formulated.

The visit began on an upbeat note with enthusiastic crowds assembling to offer their greetings. The president, in turn, seemed genuinely eager to improve trading opportunities between the U.S. and Africa. The African growth and opportunity bill was being debated in the U.S. Congress with the object of promoting his aim, and his slogan “Trade Not Aid” underlined his determination to replace the discouraging feelings of dependency on the part of the Africans with a dynamic and mutually partnership.

To that end Clinton initially targeted a handful of countries deemed to have already demonstrated reformist tendencies–countries in which progress had been made toward a more democratic form of government, toward the establishment of internal security, and toward economic recovery and the elimination of corruption. These, henceforward, would be the criteria upon which further opportunities for profitable cooperation with the U.S. would depend. Eritrea, Ethiopia, Uganda, and Rwanda in particular were singled out as fulfilling these requirements and also because they were led, it was thought, by men of a younger, pragmatic generation with whom the U.S. could do business. Further, there was also South Africa, a nation that had set an example of magnanimity and renewal.

Yet even for the most optimistic observer, there were discernible obstacles to the fulfillment of this well-intentioned plan. In the first place, all the countries on which the president focused attention had been, and still were, heavily dependent upon foreign aid for whatever economic progress they had made. In addition, discussions that took place in a meeting with East African heads of state, held in Entebbe, Uganda, forced Clinton to revise fundamentally his interpretation of what constituted progress toward a democratic form of government. Multiparty democracy, which he had taken as his aim, was conspicuously absent from the countries singled out for approval. Nor, to the dispassionate observer, was there much evidence that a multiparty system had provided the best recipe for internal political stability elsewhere in the continent. In South Africa too, the highlight of his visit, Clinton had to review his plans when Pres. Nelson Mandela made it clear that trade was no substitute for aid in countries as poor and as lacking in natural resources as were those in Africa.

The outbreak of hostilities between Eritrea and Ethiopia on May 6 inscribed a powerful question mark against the president’s faith in the good intentions of the pragmatic young leaders who were to bring in a new era of cooperation in the Great Lakes region of Africa. The rebellion that began shortly afterward, with the support of Uganda and Rwanda, in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo raised yet further doubts.

The question then arose as to why President Clinton, whose intentions were patently sincere, assumed that the African leaders with whom he was dealing were at one with him in his aims. One explanation was the information that had been supplied to him. U.S. policy in Africa since the time of the Cold War had been bedeviled by the phenomenon immortalized by the novelist Rudyard Kipling as the “Great Game.” In the late 19th century, British attitudes toward Russian intervention in Asia had been coloured by the reports of official, semiofficial, and private adventurers enjoying the thrill of clandestine operations beyond the frontiers of India and not infrequently embellishing, if not actually inventing, accounts of Russian machinations and the vacillating loyalties of local chieftains.

These activities were repeated in Africa during the Cold War by Americans of a similar cast of mind. As a result, an opportunistic power seeker such as Jonas Savimbi was regularly described as “pro-Western” and supplied with arms to conduct a profoundly damaging rebellion against the self-styled Marxist government of Angola. Similarly, the unscrupulous “pro-Western” Mobuto Sese Seko was helped to become president of Zaire and oppressor of his people as a “bulwark against the spread of Communism in Tropical Africa.”

Even before the Cold War had ended, the exponents of the late-20th-century version of the Great Game had discovered the wellspring of a new series of plots against the interests of the West in the Muslim governments of Libya and The Sudan. Thus accused, the Muslim leaders’ not- unnatural reaction had been to conform more closely to the character defined for them by their opponents. In this situation of heightened tension, the readiness of the presidents of Uganda, Eritrea, and Ethiopia to give assistance to the rebels against the Sudanese government may well, whatever their underlying reasons, have been represented to U.S. policy makers as reinforcing the reformist and pro-Western character currently attributed to them.

These considerations reveal the need for a reassessment of U.S. policy toward Africa. If, as President Clinton clearly intended to demonstrate by his visit, the U.S. is eager to help Africa overcome the constraints that poverty, corruption, and political instability have imposed on the continent’s development, it is necessary to understand and give priority to the genuine needs and aspirations of individual African countries rather than using them as pawns in a geopolitical power struggle.

Kenneth Ingham is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Bristol, Eng.

AWESOME PLACES TO VISIT IN GHANA.

Ghana Independence Square .

Are you planning a trip to Ghana this Christmas?

 Its actually “The Year of Return” in Ghana and according to the tourism ministry of Ghana, The Year of Return is about 2019 PANAFEST/ Emancipation Day which will mark 400 years of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in the history of the black man.

It is basically to encourage our brothers and sisters of the African family to return to Ghana and for that matter Africa to invest and help develop their roots.

Underscored by the United States Congress’ recently passed Act, H.R. 1242 – 400 Years of African-American Experience, the Year of Return, Ghana 2019 is the only centrally organized public-private partnership with an African nation commemorating the quatercentenary of the arrival of Africans in the United States.

The “Year of Return, Ghana 2019” is a major landmark marketing campaign targeting the African – American and Diaspora Market to mark 400 years of the Slave Trade.

Here are some awesome places to visit in Ghana to boost your vacation

The Kwame Nkrumah Museum

The Kwame Nkrumah Museum

The Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum and memorial park is located in downtown Accra, the capital of Ghana. It is dedicated to the prominent Ghanaian President Kwame Nkrumah. The memorial complex was dedicated in 1992, and is situated on the site of the former British colonial polo grounds in Accra.

Jamestown, Accra

Jamestown originated as a community that emerged around the 17th-century British James Fort, merging with Accra as the city grew. These days, Jamestown is one the poorest neighbourhoods of Accra – full of beautifully dishevelled colonial buildings, clapboard houses and corrugated iron shacks – but it remains vibrant. For a great view of the city and the busy and colourful fishing harbour (haze and pollution permitting), climb to the top of the whitewashed lighthouse.

The Kakum National Park

Kakum National Park

Kakum National Park is on coast of southern Ghana, in West Africa. It protects an area of rainforest, home to endangered mammals such as forest elephants, bongo antelopes and primates like the Diana monkey. The park is rich in butterflies and birds, including African grey parrots and hornbills. The Canopy Walkway, suspended 30 meters above the ground, provides treetop views of the forest.

The Akosombo Dam

The Akosombo Dam, also known as the Volta Dam, is a hydroelectric dam on the Volta River in southeastern Ghana in the Akosombo gorge and part of the Volta River Authority. The construction of the dam flooded part of the Volta River Basin, and led to the subsequent creation of Lake Volta.

The Accra beach hotel

The Accra beach hotel
The Accra beach hotel

Rockley / Accra BeachAlso known as Accra Beach, this very popular south coast beach offers a combination of exciting waves and calm swimming. The southern end of the beach is perfect for smaller children, as there is a pool-like area protected by rocks that break the force of the waves.

Tafi-Atome Monkey Sanctuary

Tafi-Atome Monkey Sanctuary
Tafi-Atome Monkey Sanctuary
  • For the past 200 years, the Mona monkeys inhabiting the tropical forest surrounding the small village of Tafi-Atome have been protected because it was believed they were messengers to the gods. In 1996, the village began broader efforts to protect their forest and monkeys, as well as to offer tours for visitors.As a result of these efforts, the monkey population has increased to about 200 and the forest, with its many species of birds and butterflies, has been preserved. The playful monkeys are wild but often come down very close to visitors.Revenue from tourism has brought electricity to the village, as well as improvements to the school and a community clinic.

The Accra mall

The Accra mall
The Accra mall

The Accra Mall is a shopping center in AccraGhana, located on the Spintex road adjacent to the Tema Motorway. The mall was commissioned on July 4, 2008.

The Aqua Safari

GhanaAqua Safari
GhanaAqua Safari
GhanaAqua Safari

Hotel, GhanaAqua Safari is the answer to an immense demand for high-end accommodation and hang out spots in the coastal area of Ada in the Greater Accra Region, 1 hour outside the city center. … The hotel’s least fine feature happens to be the rooms, which consists of 71 standard and deluxe rooms, and chalets.

Manhyia Palace

The Manhyia Palace is the seat of the Asantehene of Asanteman, as well as his official residence. It is located at Kumasi, the capital of the Ashanti Kingdom and Ashanti Region. The first palace is now a museum.

Kempinski Hotel

Kempinski Hotel
Kempinski Hotel

Kempinski Hotel Gold Coast City – Accra is the only five-star luxury hotel offering state of the art meeting facilities and services in the city. Conveniently located in the downtown area and in close proximity to the State House, the Accra International Conference Centre and the National Theatre.

Afadjato Mountain

Afadjato Mountain
Afadjato Mountain

Mount Afadja, known in the Ewe language as Afadjoto, is the highest mountain in Ghana. The summit of this peak is located near the border with Togo, in the Volta Region of Ghana, close to the village of Liati Wote in Afadzato South District

Volta Serene Hotel

Volta Serene Hotel
Volta Serene Hotel

Volta Serene Hotel in Ghana is the only four-star facility located in the heart of the regional capital, Ho. We provide high quality accommodations and services for conference guests and delegates, as well as honeymooners and other leisure travelers. Our hotel sits atop the picturesque Kabakaba Hill in Ho and our panoramic terraces provide the most magnificent views of the Ho township.

Wli waterfalls

Wli waterfalls
Wli waterfalls

The Wli waterfalls is the highest water fall in West Africa. The falls is known locally as Agumatsa waterfalls – meaning, “Allow Me to Flow.” It is located in the Hohoe municipality of the Volta Region, the land of the Ewe culture. It is approximately 280 kilometers from the capital Accra.

Volta Hotel Akosombo

Volta Hotel Akosombo
Volta Hotel Akosombo

This is what you can expect here at Volta Hotel Akosombo. What could be better than staying in a room of quiet elegance? How about indulging your senses with one of Ghana’s breathtaking views stretched out before you?

The hotel is situated on a 12.6-acre land overlooking the Volta Lake (the second largest man-made lake in the world) and the Akosombo hydroelectric dam. Volta Hotel is definitely a haven of comfort, hospitality, and natural beauty.

Labadi Beach Hotel

Labadi Beach Hotel
Labadi Beach Hotel

Labadi Beach Hotel features an outdoor swimming pool and a tennis court, and invites guests to enjoy a meal at the 24-hour restaurant. It was completely renovated in 2011 and is ready to offer accommodation in 164 rooms. Housekeeping, ironing service and wake up service are also included.

The venue lies in the centre of Accra. It is approximately a 20-minute drive from Independence Square.

The accommodation is conveniently situated close to many attractions and sites, including a memorial park and a castle.

Paga Crocodile Pond
Paga Crocodile Pond
Paga Crocodile Pond

Paga Crocodile Pond is a sacred pond in Paga in the Upper East Region of Ghana, which is inhabited by West African crocodiles. Due to the friendliness of the reptiles, it has become popular among tourists and the pond is now reliant on tourism to ensure the population of crocodiles remain fed and healthy.

Keta Lagoon Resort

Keta Lagoon Resort
Keta Lagoon Resort
Keta Lagoon Resort

Built-in 2013 on the Keta Lagoon to create a serene environment for tourists and holiday makers.. humans live above, fish live below

The Cape Coast Castle

Cape Coast Castle is one of about forty “slave castles”, or large commercial forts, built on the Gold Coast of West Africa by European traders. It was originally a Portuguese “feitoria” or trading post, established in 1555. However in 1653 the Swedish Africa Company constructed a timber fort there

The Elmina Castle

Elmina Castle

Elmina Castle was erected by the Portuguese in 1482 as Castelo de São Jorge da Mina, also known as Castelo da Mina or simply Mina in present-day Elmina, Ghana. It was the first trading post built on the Gulf of Guinea, and the oldest European building in existence south of the Sahara

The Mole National Park

Mole National Park
Mole National Park
Mole National Park

Mole National Park protects is an area of Savannah and forest in northern Ghana. It’s home to elephants, leopards and rare birds such as the white-backed vulture. In the western part of the park, the Konkori Escarpment has panoramic views and overlooks waterholes where animals drink. There are waterfalls along the Kparia and Polzen rivers. To the south, Larabanga village has a centuries-old, Sudanese-style mosque

Movenpick Ambassador Hotel

Movenpick ambassador hotel accra
Movenpick ambassador hotel accra
Movenpick ambassador hotel accra

Set in an urban oasis within the city centre business district, our contemporary 5 Star hotel is only 7km from the airport where you will receive a warm Ghanaian welcome. A tranquil home away from home, the Mövenpick Ambassador Hotel Accra provides an atmosphere of ease and convenience where our guests can be perfectly in control of their time whilst taking advantage of everything on their doorstep. The Accra Financial Centre, World Trade Centre, International Conference Centre and Government Ministries are all close by.

The Sogakope Beach Resort

sogakope beach resort
sogakope beach resort
sogakope beach resort

Sogakope Beach Resort is more than just an elegant beach resort, it is the pride of Sogakope in the Volta Region of Ghana and its set in a rich and tranquil gardens with the famous Volta River on its doorstep.  Where indulgence meets relaxation, this new purpose built resort offers a peaceful and relaxed lifestyle in a well-designed grounds and facilities with a true African feel yet modern.

The Adomi Bridge

adomi bridge
adomi bridge
adomi bridge

The Adomi Bridge is a bridge located in Ghana in West Africa. It spans the Volta River that drains into the Gulf of Guinea, south of the Akosombo Dam. It is a two-hinged steel arch bridge with a deck suspended by cables.

The Royal Senchi

The Royal Senchi
The Royal Senchi
The Royal Senchi

The Royal Senchi, built in 2012, is the first luxury 4*hotel infused with the serenity of the Volta Lake complemented by the highest standards of hospitality services. With more than 80 rooms and suites, it has been designed to blend into the appealing, balmy environment of the Senchi River and the surrounding rich forestry. Its location is distant from the hectic city life, yet near enough for easy commuting. The concept of the hotel is to offer a destination that fuses into the relaxed nature of the environment whilst providing hospitality standards that befit a four star establishment. Its colours, the architectural curves, as well as the shapes of the buildings lend to the ‘nature look’ and feel of the entire property.

GOD BLESS GHANA